Luncheon Meeting on July 19, 2018

Topic

Xi in Command

Speaker

Michael Ipson

International Banker

 

 

Overview

Xi Jinping, President of the People’s Republic of China, has introduced new and far reaching political and economic policies since assuming leadership in 2012.  He has also become increasingly powerful.  Xi now holds the top offices of the party (Secretary General), the state (President) and the military (Chairman, Central Military Commission) and in March, China’s National People’s Congress amended its constitution eliminating presidential term limits.  Xi Jinping is officially referred to as the Paramount Leader of the PRC.

Our guest, Michael Ipson, will review how Xi has centralized his personal power over China and look forward as he embarks upon his second term as supreme leader.  In his presentation he will discuss China’s growing global role and analyze the major challenges that China and President Xi face including the economy and environmental quality.

Michael Ipson began his engagement with China in 1966 as an exchange student in Hong Kong.  After pursuing graduate studies in Chinese and Vietnamese history, , he began a career in banking, spending 28 years in Hong Kong and China.  During the last five years he spent his second sojourn in Beijing, including two-and-a-half years as Country Manager for International Finance Corporation, the private sector arm of the World Bank.  He continues to travel to China working with financial institutions.

Agenda

Thursday, July 19, 2018
11:30 am: Registration
11:50 am: Luncheon
12:50 pm: Program

Luncheon Menu

  • TBD

Luncheon Cost

  • $29 for members
  • $35 for guests
  • Credit card charge: $2 each person
  • Lecture is open to the public at no charge, beginning at 12:50pm

Registration

To register by mail, fax, or phone, click here to view or download the Luncheon Reservation form in PDF file format and follow the instructions.

Location

4860 Carmel Valley Rd
Carmel-By-The-Sea, CA 93923

Luncheon Meeting on June 8, 2018

Topic

The Demise of the Arab Spring and the Deep State

Speaker

Dr. Robert Springborg

Italian Institute of
International Affairs

and
Naval Postgraduate School (ret.)

 

 

Overview

The term “deep state” came into American parlance in the early months of the Trump administration on both sides of the political spectrum. Few Americans are aware, however, that the concept of the deep state can be traced to the Middle East and North Africa. Indeed, many specialists on the region believe that the existence of deep states helps to explain the rise and fall of the Arab Spring.

In his remarks, Dr. Springborg will suggest that applying the term “deep state” to U.S. institutions is stretching the concept too far. Unlike in the Middle East, American coercive institutions are under civilian control and subject to the rule of law, and they have not penetrated and subordinated other governmental bodies or civil society as they have in the Middle East. The negative consequences Arab deep states had for both political and economic development undermined the ability of their people to successfully organize nationally and to convert their Arab Spring movements into democratic transitions. More recently, deep states that survived in the Arab republics have been reinforced, as have those in Turkey and Iran; attempts to build or rebuild them from the bottom up are underway in Libya, Yemen, Lebanon and Iraq, and from the top down in some of the Arab monarchies. In most of the Middle East, “real” politics that determine who gets what, when and how, are the preserve of deep states, leaving only a largely meaningless “pseudopolitics” for normal citizens.

Robert Springborg is a specialist on Middle East governance and politics, with a special focus on Egypt and U.S. policy toward the region. His books include Mubarak’s Egypt; Globalization and the Politics of Development in the Middle East; and Egypt. He has worked as a consultant on the Middle East for the U.S. Agency for International Development, the United Nations Development Program, and various British government departments. Dr. Springborg is currently a non-resident research fellow of the Italian Institute of International Affairs.

Agenda

Friday, June 8, 2018
11:30 am: Registration
11:50 am: Luncheon
12:50 pm: Program

Luncheon Menu

  • Wedgewood Salad with Italian Dressing
  • Chicken in a Pesto Cream Sauce
  • Roasted Red Potatoes and Vegetables
  • Fresh Rolls and Butter
  • Chef’s Choice Dessert
  • Coffee
  • Vegetarian Option: Tortellini in Pesto Cream Sauce with Parmesan

Luncheon Cost

  • $29 for members
  • $35 for guests
  • Credit card charge: $2 each person
  • Lecture is open to the public at no charge, beginning at 12:50pm

Registration

To register by mail, fax, or phone, click here to view or download the Luncheon Reservation form in PDF file format and follow the instructions.

Location

4860 Carmel Valley Rd
Carmel-By-The-Sea, CA 93923

Luncheon Meeting on May 17, 2018

Topic

Why Iran Remains a Challenge for U.S. Foreign Policy

Speaker

Professor Afshon Ostovar

Assistant Professor at Naval Postgraduate School

Overview

The United States and Iran have long had an adversarial relationship.  Many observers point to the U.S.’s long history of interventions into Iranian politics as the factor that has most shaped the modern relationship
between the two nations.  More recently, Iran’s expanding foothold across the Middle East has exacerbated U.S.-Iran relations. As of this writing, the most imminent threat emanates from Washington, where the Trump Administration is poised to retreat from the 2015 nuclear agreement, the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.

Afshon Ostovar, a popular professor of Middle East politics at the Naval Postgraduate School, will examine the dynamics of the U.S.-Iran relationship and the U.S.’s strategy to combat Iran’s regional influence and nuclear ambitions.

Dr. Ostovar is an Assistant Professor in the Department of National Security Affairs at NPS. His research and writing focus on conflict and security in the Middle East, with a special focus on Iran and the Persian Gulf. His most recent book, Vanguard of the Imam: Religion, Politics and Iran’s Revolutionary Guards (Oxford University Press, 2016) examines the rise of Iran’s most powerful armed force—the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, or IRGC—and its role in power politics, regional conflicts, and political violence.

Dr. Ostovar earned his B.A., summa cum laude, in Near Eastern Studies from the University of Arizona and his Ph.D. in history from the University of Michigan.

Agenda

Thursday, May 17, 2018
11:30 am: Registration
12:00: Luncheon
12:50: Program

Location

Rancho Canada
4860 Carmel Valley Road

Luncheon Menu

  • Asian Salad
  • Teriyaki Salmon
  • Roasted Red Potatoes and Vegetables
  • Chef’s Choice Dessert
  • Vegetarian Option: Vegetable Stir Fry
Luncheon Cost:
  • $29 for members
  • $35 for guests
  • Credit card charge: $2 each person
  • Lecture is open to the public at no charge, beginning at 12:50pm

Registration

To register by mail, fax, or phone click here to view or download the Luncheon Reservation form in PDF file format and follow the instructions.

 

Luncheon Meeting on April 20, 2018

Topic

A Global Water Crisis?
The Future of Water is Closer and Better Than You Think

Speaker

Dr. Jeff Langholz

Professor at Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey

 

 

 

 

Overview

Experts warn that in the 21st century, water shortages will become increasingly common across the world. Many believe water will become the oil of the 21st century, driving major geopolitical decisions and creating a dividing line between those who have it and those who don’t. Recent water shortages in California and beyond have highlighted our shaky relationship with the world’s most important resource.

Dr. Jeff Langholz, a natural resource policy and management expert at the Middlebury Institute, argues that the potential crisis has, in fact, spurred breakthrough innovations that make water more reliable, affordable, and ecological. In his presentation, he will explore exciting new pathways to a more sustainable approach to water.

Dr. Langholz is an award-winning teacher, researcher, and entrepreneur, with a passion for “triple bottom line” solutions to global challenges. A primary focus of his work has been sustainability of the world’s natural resources. For this, he has drawn on extensive professional experience with the IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and consultancies across North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. His work has been covered by The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, National Geographic, The Economist, and more than 250 other media outlets.

A former U.S. Peace Corps volunteer in West Africa and Fulbright Scholar in
South Africa, Dr. Langholz earned his Ph.D. in Natural Resource Policy and Management from Cornell University.

Agenda

  • 11:30 AM – Registration
  • 11:50 AM – Luncheon
  • 12:50 PM – Program

Location

Rancho Canada
4860 Carmel Valley Road

Registration

This event has ended.

Luncheon Meeting on March 27, 2018

Topic

North Korea’s Weapons of Mass Destruction

Speaker

Melissa Hanham

Senior Research Associate,
James Martin Center for
Nonproliferation Studies
,
Middlebury Institute of
International Studies at Monterey

 

 

 

Overview

Melissa Hanham is a senior research associate at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS), as well as the Mixed-Methods, Evaluation, Training & Analysis (META) Lab. She studies East Asian security and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), with particular focus on North Korean WMD procurement and proliferation networks, and China’s nuclear posture. She also studies Chinese, South Korean, and Japanese nuclear exports, as well as East and Southeast Asian export control systems and proliferation finance activities.

Hanham supports MIIS’ research at both CNS and META Lab by investigating new techniques in open source geospatial analysis, incorporating satellite and aerial imagery and other remote sensing data, large data sets, social media, 3D modeling, and GIS mapping. She teaches “Geospatial Tools for Nonproliferation Analysis” at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies, and is a regular contributor to Arms Control Wonk.

Agenda

  • 11:30 am registration
  • noon luncheon
  • 1-2 pm program

Location

Rancho Canada
4860 Carmel Valley Road

Reservations

This event has ended.

 

Luncheon Meeting on February 27, 2018

Topic

Challenges to South Africa’s Democracy

Speaker

E. Philip Morgan

Professor Emeritus,
Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey

 

 

 

Overview

Professor Morgan is the former Dean of the Graduate School of International Policy Studies at MIIS. While a professor of politics, public administration and development throughout his career, he has also worked with The World Bank, USAID, and UNDP on diagnostic studies, technical assistance and training. He has lived and worked extensively in both the French and English-speaking countries of Sub-Saharan Afri-ca, with a long-term commitment to the countries of Southern Africa. Philip Morgan earned his PhD. in Political Science at Syracuse University.

Hanham supports MIIS’ research at both CNS and META Lab by investigating new techniques in open source geospatial analysis, incorporating satellite and aerial imagery and other remote sensing data, large data sets, social media, 3D modeling, and GIS mapping. She teaches “Geospatial Tools for Nonproliferation Analysis” at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies, and is a regular contributor to Arms Control Wonk.

Agenda

  • 11:30 am registration
  • noon luncheon
  • 1-2 pm program

Location

Rancho Canada
4860 Carmel Valley Road

Reservations

This event has ended.