Passport for November-December 2020

This is an online version of the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). You may click here to see other online issues or click here to reach the archive of recent issues in PDF format. 

Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19

Check your email on the scheduled days for links to these videos

November 15, 2020

Michael Auslin
Stanford University
Asia’s New Geopolitics

The Indo-Pacific is fast becoming the world’s dominant region. Now, as it grows in power and wealth, long-simmering geopolitical competition has re-emerged there. Drawing on his most recent book, entitled Asia’s New Geopolitics: Essays on Reshaping the Indo-Pacific (Hoover Institution Press, 2020), Michael Auslin discusses two key issues transforming the region: China’s ambitious foreign and economic policies and North Korea’s quest for nuclear weapons.

Auslin is the inaugural Payson J. Treat Distinguished Research Fellow in Contemporary Asia at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, a senior fellow at Policy Exchange in London, and a senior advisor for Asia at the Halifax International Security Forum. He is the author of six books, including the best-selling The End of the Asian Century: War, Stagnation, and the Risks to the World’s Most Dynamic Region. Previously, he was an associate professor of history at Yale University, a visiting professor at the University of Tokyo, and a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. He is a longtime contributor to The Wall Street Journal and Foreign Policy, among others.


November 30, 2020

Jonathan Lipman
Mount Holyoke College
The Muslims and Islam in Modern China: Focus on the Uyghurs

About 11 million Uyghurs live in the People’s Republic of China, largely in Xinjiang. In recent years the Chinese government has detained over a million of them, claiming that they hold extremist religious views that are a threat to national security. Many in the international community have accused China of egregious human rights abuses against the Uyghurs. In this presentation, Professor Jonathan Lipman looks at the history and current conditions in Xinjiang, the evidence for widespread abuses, and China’s justifications for its policies and methods.

Trained at Stanford as an historian of early modern and modern China, Jonathan Lipman served on the faculty of Mount Holyoke College from 1977 to 2015. In addition, he has taught as a visiting professor at Doshisha University, Quest University (Canada), Oregon State University, Yale, Harvard, and the University of Washington. Professor Lipman’s research deals primarily with the long-term residence and acculturation of Muslims in China. His 1997 book, Familiar Strangers: A History of Muslims in Northwest China, remains a standard history of the subject.


December 15, 2020

Businessman and Author
J. Morris Hicks
Connecting the Dots to a Sustainable Future

The year 2020, with its outbreak of Covid-19, catastrophic forest fires, floods, and recordsetting temperatures, tells us that nature is declining globally and at unprecedented rates. Drawing on his recent book OUTCRY: Urgent Alarms from Our Planet and What We Can Do About Them, J. Morris Hicks discusses both the impact of economic development on the natural environment and what we can do to slow, stop, or reverse the damage we have done to our biosphere. OUTCRY was co-authored with Stuart H. Scott and published on the 50th anniversary of Earth Day.

An engineer, business executive, and author, J. Morris Hicks earned a BS in industrial engineering from Auburn University and an MBA from the University of Hawaii, a degree he earned while serving as an officer in the US Coast Guard and stationed in Honolulu. Over the past decade, he has devoted himself to promoting the global conversation on sustainability and to seeking solutions to the environmental challenges we face.


Discussion Groups

WACMB offers two discussion groups. Both are free, and meet via Zoom from 4:00 to 5:30 pm. If you are interested in participating in a discussion group, please email the WACMB office at wacmb@redshift.com and let us know.

The MPC Discussion Group is moderated by Judith Glickman.
  • Monday, November 2: Ethics of Warfare and Changing Technology
  • Monday, November 16: The Erosion of Democracy in Hungary and Poland
  • Monday, November 30: Asia’s New Geopolitics: Essays on Reshaping the Indo-Pacific
  • Monday, December 14: Muslims in China Today, with a Focus on the Uyghurs
The OLLI/CSUMB Discussion Group is moderated by John Hetz
  • Monday, November 9: Topic TBA.
  • Monday, December 14: Topic also TBA.

For more information about WACMB Discussion Groups, click here.


United Nations Association Film Festival

The World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is pleased to share this announcement from the United Nations Association, which shares WACMB’s interest in international affairs:

The Monterey Bay Chapter of the United Nations Association of the USA announces its 21st annual International Documentary Film Festival. This year, the festival will offer five excellent films from Kenya, Syria, Cambodia, Gaza, and the United States.

The festival will take place from November 14 through November 18. Due to the pandemic, the festival will be completely online this year, and will be accessible from anywhere in the country. A festival pass costs $5, with the fee covering the “per click” cost of presenting the films. Pass holders may access the films at any time during the festival. For further information, go to the UNA*USA website.


A Little Background Information

On November 30, in our video series Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19, Dr. Jonathan Lipman, Emeritus Professor at Mount Holyoke College, will speak on “The Muslims and Islam in Modern China: Focus on the Uyghurs.” We’ve been hearing a lot about the Uyghurs lately. But who are the Uyghurs? Here’s some information from Dr. Lipman.

By the 15th century, the vast central region across the Ming state’s western frontier, north of Tibet and southwest of Mongolia, had become largely Muslim. It was incorporated into the great Zunghar empire, the last nomadic state in a long history stretching back to the ancient Xiongnu, and was conquered by the Manchu-led Qing dynasty in the mid-18th century. The Qing named this region Xinjiang, the New Frontier.

Its inhabitants did not use a singular ethnonym, but called themselves Musulman (Muslim), Turk (which referred to culture and language, not to national identity), or yarliq (local, meaning “from here).” In the 1920s, under the influence of the Soviet “nationalities policy” (among others), these people gradually came to call themselves, and to be called by others, by the ancient (non-Muslim) name, “Uyghurs.”


An Invitation to All High School Students and Teachers

Our sister World Affairs Council in Dallas/Fort Worth invites high school students and teachers from every WAC across the country to participate in its Global Young Leaders (GYL) Program. This free program, offered online via Zoom, includes student leadership workshops, service projects, career days, competitions, Council speakers, 20 Under 20 programming, internships, teacher workshops, teacher awards, and more. The GYL Program will continue in the spring with many other exciting opportunities.

To register, or for further information, go to this page on the Dallas/Fort Worth chapter’s website. If you are involved with high school education, don’t miss this wonderful, free, socially distanced program!.


Take a Break with a Quick Take!

Did you know that most videos in our Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19 series are only about 15 to 20 minutes long? Presented by experts in their fields, these videos are free, and always available in our video library on our website. Get a Quick Take on a quick break today!


Answers to the October Cryptograms

1AI LEZI KSX XS YRHIVWXERH XLEX ALEX AI HS MR XLI ASVPH MW RSX SRPC KSSH JSV XLI ASVPH; MX’W KSSH JSV YW. MX’W RSX E JSVQ SJ TLMPERXLVSTC; MX’W E JSVQ SJ REXMSREP WIGYVMXC.
— VMGLEVH LEEWW
Solution: We have got to understand that what we do in the world is not only good for the world; it’s good for us. It’s not a form of philanthropy; it’s a form of national security. —Richard Haass

2GSVIV ZIV ML ULIVRTM OZMWH; RG RH GSV GIZEVOVI LMOB DSL RH ULIVRTM.
— ILYVIG OLFRH HGVEVMHLM
Solution: There are no foreign lands. It is the traveler only who is foreign. — Robert Louis Stevenson

3UTNG V TNFO QIDNHILE QVRT, “BVPN VQ TFOL,” V’D FBUFEQ
SNDKSNL SI FQZ, “JIDKFONL SI UTFS?”
— QELGNE X. TFOOVQ
Solution: When I hear somebody sigh, “Life is hard,” I’m always tempted to ask, “Compared to what?” — Sydney J. Harris


This is the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). Founded in 1951, the council is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization established to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs. WACMB is a tax-exempt 501 (c) (3) organization, EIN-770301206. Contributions are tax deductible as permitted by law. WACMB sponsors monthly luncheons, discussion groups, and student scholarships.

Corporate and institutional support for the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is provided by:

  • California State University Monterey Bay
  • Defense Language Institute
  • Monterey Peninsula College
  • Naval Postgraduate School
  • Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey
  • Rancho Canada
  • Horan & Lloyd Law Firm

WACMB Logo

Passport for October 2020

This is an online version of the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). You may click here to see other online issues or click here to reach the archive of recent issues in PDF format. 

Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19

Check your email on the scheduled days for links to these videos

October15, 2020
Bradley J. Strawser
Naval Postgraduate School

Reflections on the Ethics of Warfare and Changing Technology

Dr. Bradley Strawser discusses the ethics of modern warfare and how technology has impacted the degree of civilian casualties. He explores how radical changes in military technology once drove a massive increase in civilian harm in warfare, but argues that today, advances in military technology are reversing that trend, giving us reason for optimism in the future.

Bradley Strawser teaches philosophy in the Defense Analysis department at the Naval Postgraduate School. He is also a Research Associate at Oxford University’s Institute for Ethics, War, and Armed Conflict, which is located in Oxford, UK. Dr. Strawser received his PhD in Philosophy from the University of Connecticut. He has written extensively and lectured throughout the United States and Europe on the ethics of war and peace, military ethics, bioethics, and development ethics.

October 30, 2020
Anna Grzymala-Busse
Stanford University

The Erosion of Democracy in Hungary and Poland

After the collapse of communism in 1989, Hungary and Poland were among the leaders in enacting reforms; they were the first to embrace democracy and to pursue free markets. Yet in the last decade, voters in both Hungary and Poland have elected governments that have attacked liberal democracy by stacking the courts, stifling the free media, barring immigration, and pursuing other self-serving policies. What happened? Professor Anna Grzymala-Busse examines the roots and consequences of the erosion of democracy and why both of these nations have taken this path.

Anna Grzymala-Busse is the Michelle and Kevin Douglas Professor of International Studies in the Political Science department, a Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and the Director of the Europe Center, all at Stanford University. A native of Poland, she has studied post-communist politics in Central and Eastern Europe. She earned her PhD in Government from Harvard University


Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19

The following is the tentative schedule and list of topics for upcoming episodes of WACMB’s “Quick Takes” video program. On the scheduled day, you will receive an email with a link that will take you to the video.

  • November 15: Michael Auslin, Stanford University, who will speak on his new book, Asia’s New Geopolitics: Essays on Reshaping the Indo-Pacific
  • November 30: Jonathan Lipman, Mt. Holyoke College, who will speak on “Muslims in China Today, with a Focus on the Uyghurs.”
  • December 15: J. Morris Hicks, author and engineer, who will speak on “Connecting the Dots to a Sustainable Future.”

Video Library

Just a reminder: every past episode of our “quick takes” series, “Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19,” is available at no cost in our online video library. In addition, videos of a number of our previous luncheon talks (remember when we’d gather together in one room for lunch and a lecture?) are also available there. Go to the Speakers, Topics, and Videos page of this website for links to the videos, including these:

  • Robert Tomlinson on National Security Affairs in the Age of Covid-19
  • Emily Meierding on Oil and Gas Disputes
  • Alex Saragoza on US-Mexico Relations
  • Anne Marie Baylouny on The Syrian Refugee Crisis
  • Francis Fukuyama on The Global Rise of Populist Nationalism
    . . . and more!


Discussion Groups

WACMB offers two discussion groups: one with MPC and one with the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at CSUMB. Both are free. Due to current restrictions on public gatherings, both groups are being conducted on Zoom. If you are interested in participating in a discussion group, please email the WACMB office at wacmb@redshift.com and let us know of your interest.

The MPC Discussion Group, moderated by Judith Glickman, is meeting via Zoom. Meetings take place from 4:00 to 5:30 pm.

Monday, October 5: “Modi’s Agenda in the Year of the Pandemic,” with introductory remarks by Anshu Chatterjee.

Monday, October 19: “Globalization and Governance,” with introductory remarks by Jonathan Czarnecki.

The OLLI/CSUMB Discussion Group, moderated by John Hetz, will meet via Zoom on Monday, October 12 from 4:00 to 5:30 pm, to discuss “Narendra Modi’s Nationalist Agenda in the Era of the Pandemic.”


For more information about WACMB Discussion Groups, click here.


Welcome to Our New Members

The World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area extends a warm welcome to our newest members!

  • Olivia Morgan
  • Celeste Ventura
  • Joe Viviano

Remember to Vote!

Election Day is Tuesday, November 3. Vote-By-Mail ballots will be sent to all registered voters in California beginning on October 5. Why wait? Fill out your ballot right away and return it either through the mail or in person. You must return your ballot no later than November 3. Go to vote.ca.gov to learn more.


CRYPTOGRAMS!

For your shelter-in-place entertainment, The Passport presents WACMB’s second-ever cryptograms. All are quotations that are (at least somewhat) relevant to world affairs. Each quotation is followed by its author’s name. Each cryptogram has its own code. Answers will appear in next month’s Passport.

  1. AI LEZI KSX XS YRHIVWXERH XLEX ALEX AI HS MR XLI ASVPH MW RSX SRPC KSSH JSV XLI ASVPH; MX’W KSSH JSV YW. MX’W RSX E JSVQ SJ TLMPERXLVSTC; MX’W E JSVQ SJ REXMSREP WIGYVMXC.
    — VMGLEVH LEEWW
  2. GSVIV ZIV ML ULIVRTM OZMWH; RG RH GSV GIZEVOVI LMOB DSL RH ULIVRTM.
    — ILYVIG OLFRH HGVEVMHLM
  3. UTNG V TNFO QIDNHILE QVRT, “BVPN VQ TFOL,” V’D FBUFEQ
    SNDKSNL SI FQZ, “JIDKFONL SI UTFS?”
    — QELGNE X. TFOOVQ


Answer Key for September’s Passport Crossword Puzzle

(with your editor’s apologies for the nasty cross at 59-Across/43-Down, which was ridiculously difficult.)



This is the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). Founded in 1951, the council is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization established to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs. WACMB is a tax-exempt 501 (c) (3) organization, EIN-770301206. Contributions are tax deductible as permitted by law. WACMB sponsors monthly luncheons, discussion groups, and student scholarships.

Corporate and institutional support for the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is provided by:

  • California State University Monterey Bay
  • Defense Language Institute
  • Monterey Peninsula College
  • Naval Postgraduate School
  • Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey
  • Rancho Canada
  • Horan & Lloyd Law Firm


WACMB Logo


Passport for September 2020

This is an online version of the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). You may click here to see other online issues or click here to reach the archive of recent issues in PDF format. 

Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19

Check your email on the scheduled days for links to these videos

September 15, 2020
Anshu Chatterjee
Naval Postgraduate School

Narendra Modi’s Nationalist Agenda in the Era of the Pandemic

The past decade has been one of the most challenging decades in India’s modern history. The pandemic introduced a new variable into a country that is facing a declining economy and rising challenges from China, along with the simultaneous rise of Hindu nationalism. In 2019, the BJP, India’s Hindu nationalist party, won a majority for the first time. Immediately after winning its majority, the BJP made two controversial decisions: one removing the autonomy of the Kashmir region, and the second reducing the rights of noncitizens, producing a backlash in civil society. Professor Anshu Chatterjee sheds light on these issues and the implications of the spread of Covid-19 in this setting. Anshu Chatterjee is a Senior Lecturer in the National Security Affairs Department at the Naval Postgraduate School. She received her PhD in Asian Studies from the University of California, Berkeley.

September 30, 2020
Jonathan Czarnecki
Naval War College

Globalization, Governance, and Change

Globalization, the international system that has become a defining force in world affairs and its governance within nation states, can be credited with lifting over a billion people out of severe poverty. But there is increasing opposition to the international integration of capital, technology, and information across national borders. Dr. Jonathan Czarnecki analyses this critical debate and provides insight into our future. Jonathan Czarnecki is Professor of Joint Military/Maritime Operations in the US Naval War College Program at the Naval Postgraduate School. A retired Army Colonel with 27 years of experience in the field, Dr. Czarnecki earned his PhD in Political Science and Applied Social Statistics from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He is the author of over 60 scholarly articles on national security and international relations.


Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19

The following is the tentative schedule and list of topics for upcoming episodes of WACMB’s “Quick Takes” video program. On the scheduled day, you will receive an email with a link that will take you to the video.

  • October 15: Bradley Strawser, NPS – Ethics and Public Policy
  • October 30: Anna Grzymala-Busse, Stanford University – The Erosion of Democracy in Hungary and Poland
  • November 15: TBD
  • November 30: Jonathan Lipman, Mt. Holyoke College – Muslims in China Today

Remember: all the past episodes of our “Quick Takes: Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19” series, along with many videos of previous luncheon talks, are available on the Speakers, Topics, and Videos page of this website.


Discussion Groups

WACMB coordinates two ongoing discussion groups that address a new current topic each month. The sessions are are free and open to the public.


Free MIIS Lecture Series

The Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS) is a longtime and valued partner of WACMB. We are pleased to share their announcement of a free virtual lecture series this fall. Presentations will be followed by Q&A sessions with the audience.

The lectures will take place on Zoom, and advance registration is required in order to receive a Zoom invitation. To register, go to https://tinyurl.com/MIIS-WorldViews and follow the prompts there. Here’s the schedule:

  • Wednesday, September 9, 1:00 – 2:00 PDT
    Professor Pushpa Iyer, Director of the MIIS Center for Conflict Studies, will speak on Pandemic, Protests, and Politics: Prospects for Peace
  • Wednesday, October 14, 4:30 – 5:30 PDT
    Professor Jason Blazakis, Director of the MIIS Center on Terrorism, Extremism, and Counter-Terrorism, will speak on Delving Into the Extremism of White Supremacy: Who Are They, and What Do They Want?
  • Wednesday, October 28, 12:00 – 1:00 PDT
    Professor Jason Scorse, Director of the MIIS Center for the Blue Economy, will speak on The Ocean Climate Action Plan: Turning Ideas Into Advocacy
  • Wednesday, November 11, 4:30 – 5:30 PST
    Professor William Potter, Director of the MIIS James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, and Aubrey Means, MIIS MA Candidate in Non-proliferation Studies and Terrorism Studies, will speak on The US-Russian Nuclear Predicament: Are We Doomed to Cooperate or Simply Doomed?

Crossword Puzzle

For your Shelter-in-Place entertainment, the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area presents its first-ever crossword puzzle! Answers will appear in the October Passport.

You can print this page from your web browser and fill in by hand or click the button below to get a version you can fill in online and print or save.

WAC-Crossword-Puzzle-1b-v03-cropped



This is the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). Founded in 1951, the council is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization established to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs. WACMB is a tax-exempt 501 (c) (3) organization, EIN-770301206. Contributions are tax deductible as permitted by law. WACMB sponsors monthly luncheons, discussion groups, and student scholarships.

Corporate and institutional support for the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is provided by:

  • California State University Monterey Bay
  • Defense Language Institute
  • Monterey Peninsula College
  • Naval Postgraduate School
  • Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey
  • Rancho Canada
  • Horan & Lloyd Law Firm

WACMB Logo

Passport for August 2020

This is an online version of the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). You may click here to see other online issues or click here to reach the archive of recent issues in PDF format. 

Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19

Check your email on the scheduled days for links to these videos

August 15, 2020
Emily Meierding
Naval Postgraduate School

The Pandemic and the Price War: Oil During Covid-19

As the Covid-19 pandemic intensified, oil markets experienced a rocky ride. Dr. Emily Meierding explores the reasons for the collapse of oil prices in the spring of 2020 and discusses the prospects for recovery. Emily Meierding is an Assistant Professor in the Department of National Security Affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey. Her research examines energy geopolitics and environmental security issues. Dr. Meierding’s book, The Oil Wars Myth: Petroleum and the Causes of International Conflict, has just been published by Cornell University Press. She holds a BA in history from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and an MA and PhD in political science from the University of Chicago.

August 30, 2020
Robert Tomlinson
Naval War College

National Security Affairs in the Age of Covid-19

Dr. Robert Tomlinson looks at how America’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic will dramatically shape our foreign policy and national security choices. He argues for the development and promulgation of a new national security strategy that takes into account the new geopolitical reality of America’s role in a post-Covid world. Robert Tomlinson is an Associate Professor of National Security Affairs in the Naval War College’s program at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey. Dr. Tomlinson has a BA from the College of the Holy Cross, master’s degrees from Golden Gate University and California State University, Northridge, and a PhD from Claremont Graduate University. He served in the US Air Force for 26 years, retiring at the rank of Colonel.


Click here for a list of all “Quick Takes” episodes, both published and planned. On the scheduled day, you will receive an email with a link that will take you to the video.


Video Library

Remember: every past episode of our “Quick Takes: Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19” series is available in our video library, along with many videos of previous luncheon talks. Go to our Speakers, Topic, and Videos page to view the following Quick Takes:

  • Philipp Bleek on How Prepared Were Governments to Meet Covid-19-Related Issues? (coming on July 30)
  • Mike Clancy on Covid-19 and Climate Change
  • Craig Whiteside on ISIS
  • Glenn E. Robinson’s on Global Jihad

WACMB coordinates two ongoing discussion groups that address a new current topic each month. The sessions are are free and open to the public.

Click the headline above to read more.


High School Essay Contest Winners

This spring, WACMB launched a new initiative: a high school essay contest. Thanks to the Scholarship Committee – Michelle Amirkhanian, Brett Borden, Jean Hurd, Chris Keehn, and Larry Johnson (ex officio) – for their hard work in creating the contest, which aims to encourage interest in international affairs and global studies among local high school students.

Entrants were required to write an essay that addressed the following: If you could change something in current world affairs, what would it be? Why should it be changed, and how would you change it?

You can read or listen to the winning essays by clicking here.

Congratulations to the winners!

  • Jasmine Agha is a junior at York School. Jasmine’s essay, “Fear and Hopelessness in the Unknown,” addresses the catastrophic civil war in Syria and the plight of Syrian refugees.
  • Jane Hoffman is a junior at Santa Catalina School. Jane’s essay, “Confronting the Climate Crisis,” encourages extensive international collaboration to reduce carbon emissions.
  • CJ Hunt is a sophomore at Seaside High. CJ’s essay, “The Problem of Capitalism,” argues for an international shift to economies that are driven by the common good rather than by profits.
  • Angelia Shi is a junior at Santa Catalina School. Angelia’s essay, “Our Future: A Religious Melting Pot,” recommends the study of comparative religions as a way to increase tolerance and decrease conflicts.

How the World is Approaching Covid-19

At the July WACMB Board meeting (conducted via Zoom to allow for safe social distancing), there was a discussion about the ways that different countries are addressing Covid-19. Here in the US, of course, we’re using masks, handwashing, social distancing, and sanitizing wipes, etc. But what practices are encouraged and discouraged elsewhere?

Doug Rogers, our Publicity chair, reached out to friends all around the world to ask about what’s being done in their countries, and they quickly responded.

The poster to the left is from Australia, and emphasizes hand washing for at least 20 seconds. (Sound familiar?)

The other responses came as links to videos, which are mostly PSAs. We think you’ll enjoy them!

Remember: Wash your hands. Wear your mask. Maintain social distancing. We’re all in this together.


CRYPTOGRAMS!

Answers to the Cryptograms in July’s Passport

  1. GN GKV’N UVYQAD NY NIPM ILYQN BUIOU. YVU SQKN LUPGUTU GV GN. IVR GN GKV’N UVYQAD NY LUPGUTU GV GN. YVU SQKN ZYHM IN GN.
    -UPUIVYH HYYKUTUPN
    ANSWER: It isn’t enough to talk about peace. One must believe in it. And it isn’t enough to believe in it. One must work at it.
    -Eleanor Roosevelt
  2. YVH BXWWHG RW MVRPV SWH HWLQGHC MVXY BQCY TH HWLQGHL RC BSGH RBOSGYXWY YVXW YVH YVRWZ YVXY BQCY TH HWLQGHL.
    -LHXW XPVHCSW
    ANSWER: The manner in which one endures what must be endured is more important than the thing that must be endured.
    -Dean Acheson
  3. VG JDX OSIBQ SC Z KXIN CZTSPQ BXZB HXIQSG, “Z GZJVSG JDZJ BSXQ GSJ UGSO VJQ DVQJSIN VQ BSSTXB JS BS HSSIFN SG JDX QYDSFZQJVY ZHJVJPBX JXQJ.”
    -BZKX AZIIN
    ANSWER: In the words of a very famous dead person, “A nation that does not know its history is doomed to do poorly on the Scholastic Aptitude Test.”
    -Dave Barry

This is the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). Founded in 1951, the council is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization established to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs. WACMB is a tax-exempt 501 (c) (3) organization, EIN-770301206. Contributions are tax deductible as permitted by law. WACMB sponsors monthly luncheons, discussion groups, and student scholarships.

Corporate and institutional support for the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is provided by:

  • California State University Monterey Bay
  • Defense Language Institute
  • Monterey Peninsula College
  • Naval Postgraduate School
  • Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey
  • Rancho Canada
  • Horan & Lloyd Law Firm

WACMB Logo

Passport for July 2020

This is an online version of the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). You may click here to see other online issues or click here to reach the archive of recent issues in PDF format. 

Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19

Check your email on the scheduled days for links to these videos

July 15, 2020
Mike Clancy
Citizens’ Climate Lobby

The Effect of the Covid-19 Pandemic on Climate Change:
A Silver Lining?

Economic fallout from the Covid-19 pandemic has produced the largest drop in global energy demand since the Great Depression of the 1930s. This drop in energy demand has translated directly into a drop in global CO2 emissions. If some restrictions on economic activity stay in place worldwide until the end of the year, global emissions will likely drop by about 7%, 6 to10 times larger than during the 2008 global recession. Is this falloff in emissions a “silver lining” of the pandemic that will help the world achieve the goals of the Paris Climate Accord? Mike Clancy of Citizens Climate Lobby examines this question in the context of the science of climate change and of current global economic and political challenges. Mr. Clancy is the former Technical and Scientific Director of the Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center in Monterey.

July 30, 2020
Philipp C. Bleek
miis

Helping People Help Themselves: How Prepared Were Governments to Meet Covid-19 Related Expectations of their Constituents?

In 2007, Philipp Bleek co-authored research on how prepared governments at the local, state, and federal level were to meet citizen expectations following a biological weapons attack. Drawing on that research he reflects on the degree to which authorities in the United States were prepared to meet the Covid-19-related needs of their constituents. To the extent that their preparations fell short, he considers what might have been done and, more importantly, what might now be done, to avert similar shortcomings in the future. Dr. Philipp C. Bleek is Associate Professor of Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies in Monterey. He previously served as Senior Advisor to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Nuclear, Chemical, and Biological Defense Programs.


WACMB coordinates two ongoing discussion groups that address a new current topic each month. The sessions are are free and open to the public.

Click the headline above to read more.


Click the headline above to read more.


Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19

The following is the tentative schedule and list of topics for WACMB’s new Quick Takes video program. On the scheduled day, you will receive an email with a link that will take you to the video.


Video Library

If you missed an episode of our “Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19” series, fear not! You can find that video, along with many videos of previous luncheon talks, by going to our Speakers, Topic, and Videos page. Here’s what you’ll find:

  • Craig Whiteside’s “Quick Take” on ISIS
  • Glenn E. Robinson’s “Quick Take” on Global Jihad
  • Isebill Gruhn on Europe in Turmoil
  • Jeffrey Knopf on Chemical Weapons: Lessons from Syria
  • Boyd Haight on Global Challenges for Food and Agriculture
  • Larry Diamond on Saving Democracy from Russian Rage and Chinese Ambition
  • Francis Fukuyama on The Global Rise of Populist Nationalism
  • . . . and many more!

In Memoriam: Mary E. Boyken

The World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area announces with sadness the passing of Mary E. Boyken on June 2 in Monterey after a long illness. Many will remember Mary as a dedicated Board member of the World Affairs Council who designed and produced this newsletter, The Passport.

Mary was born in San Francisco in 1930, grew up in Burlingame, CA, and graduated from Stanford University. She worked for Time magazine in New York for a time, and then moved to Washington, DC, to begin a long career
as an editor with the US Information Agency (USIA).

Mary was kind and generous, intelligent and witty. Her absence will be felt by all who knew her.


Welcome to Our New Members

The World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area extends a warm welcome to
our newest members!

  • Jennifer Acuff
  • Peter and Anne Albano
  • Jill Cody and Jerry Grimes
  • Patrick Nevis
  • Ann Pendleton
  • Andrea Quihuis
  • Cynthia and Frederick Riebe
  • Frank Shields
  • Katherine Spitz

CRYPTOGRAMS!

For your shelter-in-place entertainment, The Passport presents WACMB’s first-ever cryptograms. These cryptograms are all quotations that are (at least somewhat) relevant to world affairs. Each quotation is followed by its author’s name. Each cryptogram has its own code, so you’ll need to figure them out individually.

  1. GN GKV’N UVYQAD NY NIPM ILYQN BUIOU. YVU SQKN LUPGUTU GV GN. IVR GN GKV’N UVYQAD NY LUPGUTU GV GN. YVU SQKN ZYHM IN GN.
    -UPUIVYH HYYKUTUPN
  2. YVH BXWWHG RW MVRPV SWH HWLQGHC MVXY BQCY TH HWLQGHL RC BSGH RBOSGYXWY YVXW YVH YVRWZ YVXY BQCY TH HWLQGHL.
    -LHXW XPVHCSW
  3. VG JDX OSIBQ SC Z KXIN CZTSPQ BXZB HXIQSG, “Z GZJVSG JDZJ BSXQ GSJ UGSO VJQ DVQJSIN VQ BSSTXB JS BS HSSIFN SG JDX QYDSFZQJVY ZHJVJPBX JXQJ.”
    -BZKX AZIIN

Answers will appear in next month’s Passport.


This is the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). Founded in 1951, the council is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization established to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs. WACMB is a tax-exempt 501 (c) (3) organization, EIN-770301206. Contributions are tax deductible as permitted by law. WACMB sponsors monthly luncheons, discussion groups, and student scholarships.

Corporate and institutional support for the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is provided by:

  • California State University Monterey Bay
  • Defense Language Institute
  • Monterey Peninsula College
  • Naval Postgraduate School
  • Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey
  • Rancho Canada
  • Horan & Lloyd Law Firm

WACMB Logo

Passport for June 2020

This is an online version of the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). You may click here to see other online issues or click here to reach the archive of recent issues in PDF format. 

A Letter from WACMB’s New President

Dear WACMB Members,

I hope The Passport finds you healthy during these difficult times. I want to share some exciting news about the innovative programs that your World Affairs Council will provide to you in the months ahead when we cannot gather in person for our traditional monthly luncheon meetings.

We have developed an online video series entitled “Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19.” These ‘quick takes’ – each about 15 minutes in length – come from leading international affairs experts in our area, including faculty at the Naval Postgraduate School, the Middlebury Institute of International Studies, and the Naval War College unit based at NPS. These short analyses will be emailed to you on the 15th and the 30th of every month; all you will need to do is to click on the link in the email, and you will be taken directly to the video. We will also post these videos on our website. We have an exciting line-up coming your way for the next several months. Look inside this Passport for the full schedule. I have volunteered to be the guinea pig, and will talk about my forthcoming book on global jihad. Look for the email on June 15!

If you have received the Passport via email, you are already on our distribution list. If you don’t currently receive it by email, you can click here to send a request to be added. If you have friends and neighbors who would also like to receive this free content, please have them email us at wacmb@redshift.com and ask to be added to the distribution list.

In addition to bringing you expert analysis twice a month online, we are also moving our discussion groups online. The MPC/WACMB group under the leadership of Judith Glickman is meeting virtually via Zoom. This group is currently full, but if you are interested in participating, please send us an email and we’ll see what we can do. The OLLI/WACMB group is currently on its summer hiatus, but will resume in the fall, when it will be moderated by John Hetz.

June also ushers in a new WACMB Board for 2020-2021. I would like thank Larry Johnson and Jerry Sullivan for their incredible service to our organization. Larry has been the president for the past two years and an active volunteer for much longer, and Jerry has been our treasurer for more years than I can count. Both have termed off the Board as our bylaws mandate, but they will continue to assist the World Affairs Council: Larry will become the WACMB liaison to the OLLI program, and Jerry will assist our new treasurer, Peter Albano, to ensure an orderly transition. In addition to new officers, we are excited to welcome several new Directors as well. Please look inside this Passport for a complete list of your new Board and brief biographies of our new Directors.

Please stay safe! And until we can meet again in person, do take advantage of our new online programs to stay on top of what’s happening in international affairs!

Glenn E. Robinson
President, World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area


WACMB coordinates two ongoing discussion groups that address a new current topic each month. The sessions are are free and open to the public.

Click the headline above to read more.


Click the headline above to read more.


WACMB’s New Board Members

Peter R. Albano

WACMB’s new treasurer is an Investment Advisory Representative with Castle Rock Wealth Management, LLC, a Registered Investment Advisor providing investment analysis, portfolio management, advisory services, and financial planning. Peter has served both individual and corporate investment management clients over a 45-year career with several financial services firms. Peter graduated from Hobart College with a BA in Psychology, and studied business cycle analysis at the American Institute for Economic Research. He served for nine years as a Director of the Carmel Bach Festival, and in his spare time plays a mean bluegrass guitar.

Philipp Bleek

An Associate Professor of Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies at the Middlebury Institute for International Studies, Philipp focuses on the causes, consequences, and amelioration of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear weapons threats. From 2012 to 2013, he served as Senior Advisor to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Nuclear, Chemical, and Biological Defense Programs. Philip hold a BA in Public and International Affairs from Princeton, an MA in Public Policy from Harvard, and a PhD in Government from Georgetown.

Judith R. Glickman

Since 2017, Judith has been a Principal at JRG Organizational Consultant, where she engages in strategic thinking, planning, actioning, governance, and leadership coaching. She came to organizational consulting after a long career in educational administration, working as Principal, Superintendent, and Head of School in public and private schools from California to the UK, and as a partner with Educators’ Collaborative consulting firm. Judith earned a BA in Biological Sciences and an MA in Education, both from UC Berkeley, and a PhD in Educational Psychology from USC.

Gary J. Ohls

In his academic career, Gary taught at the University of Colorado, Texas Christian University, and the Naval War College in Newport, RI, before retiring in 2017 from the Naval War College at NPS as a Full Professor of Joint Maritime Operations and of Strategy and War. In addition to his academic career, he spent 36 years in the Marine Corps, which he entered at the enlisted level and rose to the rank of Colonel. He has a PhD in History from TCU and three master’s degrees, and continues to teach as an adjunct at the Marine Corps Command and Staff College. He has published two books and is currently doing research for his next project.

Jessica Piombo

After completing her PhD in Political Science at MIT, Jessica began teaching in the National Security Affairs Department at NPS, where she is an Associate Professor. She focuses on political transitions, statebuilding, African security, managing ethnic conflict, and US foreign policy in sub-Saharan Africa. Jessica has been a visiting scholar at the University of the Western Cape, the University of Cape Town, George Mason University, and Stanford University, and has conducted research in Cambodia, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Laos, Rwanda, South Africa, and Uganda. She is currently studying the impact of international assistance in post-conflict societies.

Douglas Porch

A Distinguished Professor Emeritus and former chair of the National Security Affairs Department at NPS, Douglas specializes in the study of counterinsurgency and North African military history. He has been an Academic Visitor at St. Antony’s College at Oxford University, and a Visiting Fellow at Oxford’s Changing Character of War Programme. He holds a BA from the University of the South, and a PhD from Corpus Christi College at Cambridge University. The author of ten books, he is currently conducting research on French combatants in World War II.


Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19

The following is the tentative schedule and list of topics for WACMB’s new “quick takes” video program. On the scheduled day, you will receive an email with a link that will take you to the video.


Program Report: Mike Clancy

For our February luncheon, we had the honor of hosting Mr. Mike Clancy, the former Science Director for the Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center in Monterey, who spoke on “The Climate Crisis: A Major Challenge for the World.” Mr. Clancy gave a fascinating big-picture history of climate, including the natural 100,000- year climate cycles that periodically produce ice ages. For much of recorded history, the Earth has enjoyed a pretty steady climate within a gradual cooling stage that produced, for example, the ‘Little Ice Age’ that preceded the industrial revolution.

Yet beginning with the industrial revolution in the 19th century, and shifting into overdrive for the past 50 years, the Earth has experienced a sudden and massive spike in surface temperatures. Monterey County has warmed up 1.9 degrees Celsius (about 3.5 degrees Fahrenheit) since 1900. This sudden warming is occurring at precisely the time the Earth should still be in a gradual cooling phase. As Mr. Clancy put it, the Earth’s temperature is headed in the “wrong direction” at a rate 20 times the speed of natural climate change. Both the direction and pace of change have been produced largely by human activity, particularly the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, where they trap heat. Carbon dioxide makes up about 72% of all greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, and methane makes up about 20%. However, methane is far more potent, and will likely be released in very large quantities as the frozen (and methane-trapping) tundra melts in Alaska and elsewhere. Meanwhile, human activity emits about twice the level of carbon dioxide that the earth can absorb.

After reviewing the impacts of climate change, Mr. Clancy discussed the political processes designed to mitigate the worst impacts of a warming climate, such as the Paris Agreement. He noted that such processes have had little success to date. The two worst offenders in terms of carbon dioxide emissions, by a considerable margin, are China (on an aggregate basis) and the US (on a per capita basis).


Correction to the May Passport

The Great Decisions discussion program is produced by the Foreign Policy Association, not by the Council on Foreign Relations.



This is the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). Founded in 1951, the council is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization established to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs. WACMB is a tax-exempt 501 (c) (3) organization, EIN-770301206. Contributions are tax deductible as permitted by law. WACMB sponsors monthly luncheons, discussion groups, and student scholarships.

Corporate and institutional support for the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is provided by:

  • California State University Monterey Bay
  • Defense Language Institute
  • Monterey Peninsula College
  • Naval Postgraduate School
  • Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey
  • Rancho Canada
  • Horan & Lloyd Law Firm


WACMB Logo


Passport for May 2020

This is an online version of the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). You may click here to see other online issues or click here to reach the archive of recent issues in PDF format. 

WAC in the Time of Coronavirus, Part 2

Given California’s continuing shelter-in-place order, we are postponing our May luncheon to a later date. Last month’s Passport updated you on some of the exciting plans from our Program committee. This month, we offer you a collection of websites with lots of free content to entertain and enlighten you as you stay healthy at home.

  • We’ll start with our own. You can access it by using your browser, or by using the camera on your phone to scan the QR code on the back of the printed Passport. Presumably, you’re already here: www.wacmb.org
  • The World Affairs Councils of America, our umbrella organization, offers podcasts, conference calls, the Cover to Cover author series, and more.
  • WAC of Philadelphia sponsors a travel program open to all WAC members. Be an optimist and make plans now for traveling in the fall.
  • Our neighbor to the north, World Affairs of Northern California, has videos, podcasts, conference calls, and more.
  • The Council on Foreign Relations, which brings you the annual Great Decisions discussion program, offers a plethora of articles about world affairs.
  • For articles and podcasts on world affairs, the arts, science, food, and much more, visit the National Public Radio website.
  • San Francisco’s Commonwealth Club has audio and video recordings of speakers on a wide range of interesting topics.
  • If for some reason you feel the need for more information about COVID-19 (or other health issues around the world), the World Health Organization is an excellent source.
  • Need a break? Surround yourself with art from the Getty Center in Los Angeles. Not to be missed: the Getty Challenge to Re-Create Art with Household Items, found in the Explore Art section of the home page.
  • Closer to home, enjoy the views from the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s ten webcams.


WACMB coordinates two ongoing discussion groups that address a new current topic each month. The sessions are are free and open to the public.

The Great Decisions program concluded on March 23. If you missed it, or if you’d like to experience it in a different version, check out these videos from the Foreign Policy Association.

To reduce the risk of spreading the COVID-19 virus, physical meetings of the WACMB Discussion Groups are temporarily suspended.

Judith Glickman and the MPC Discussion Group team are exploring ways for the group to meet virtually. Check back here on our website for further updates.

Click the headline above to read more.


Click the headline above to read more.


While our mission is to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs, our greatest concern right now is the health of our members. As we explore new ways to accomplish our mission while minimizing our members’ exposure to COVID-19, we welcome your suggestions. Please send them to wacmb@redshift.com – and stay healthy!


This is the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). Founded in 1951, the council is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization established to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs. WACMB is a tax-exempt 501 (c) (3) organization, EIN-770301206. Contributions are tax deductible as permitted by law. WACMB sponsors monthly luncheons, discussion groups, and student scholarships.

Corporate and institutional support for the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is provided by:

  • California State University Monterey Bay
  • Defense Language Institute
  • Monterey Peninsula College
  • Naval Postgraduate School
  • Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey
  • Rancho Canada
  • Horan & Lloyd Law Firm


WACMB Logo


Passport for April 2020

This is an online version of the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). You may click here to see other online issues or click here to reach the archive of recent issues in PDF format. 

WAC in the Time of Coronavirus

As we all shelter in place and hope to flatten the curve, your WACMB board and committee members are focusing on the future and planning some exciting and enlightening programs for you. Here’s what you need to know:

Both the March and April Luncheons have been postponed.

Here’s what Judy Sloan and the program committee have in the works for future luncheons:

  • Professor Craig Whiteside of the Naval War College at NPS, who was to speak at our March luncheon, will speak on ISIS: A Retrospect and Prospects for the Future
  • Professor Anna Grzymala-Busse of Stanford University will speak on the erosion of new democracies in Eastern Europe, with a particular focus on Poland and Hungary
  • Dr. Jonathan Lipman, professor emeritus at Mt. Holyoke College, will speak on Islam and Muslims in China


WACMB coordinates two ongoing discussion groups that address a new current topic each month. The sessions are are free and open to the public.

The Great Decisions program concluded on March 23. If you missed it, or if you’d like to experience it in a different version, check out these videos from the Foreign Policy Association.

To reduce the risk of spreading the COVID-19 virus, physical meetings of the WACMB Discussion Groups are temporarily suspended.

Judith Glickman and the MPC Discussion Group team are exploring ways for the group to meet virtually. Check back here on our website for further updates.

Click the headline above to read more.


Click the headline above to read more.


While our mission is to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs, our greatest concern right now is the health of our members. As we explore new ways to accomplish our mission while minimizing our members’ exposure to COVID-19, we welcome your suggestions. Please send them to wacmb@redshift.com – and stay healthy!


This is the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). Founded in 1951, the council is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization established to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs. WACMB is a tax-exempt 501 (c) (3) organization, EIN-770301206. Contributions are tax deductible as permitted by law. WACMB sponsors monthly luncheons, discussion groups, and student scholarships.

Corporate and institutional support for the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is provided by:

  • California State University Monterey Bay
  • Defense Language Institute
  • Monterey Peninsula College
  • Naval Postgraduate School
  • Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey
  • Rancho Canada
  • Horan & Lloyd Law Firm


WACMB Logo


Passport for March 2020

This is an online version of the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). You may click here to see other online issues or click here to reach the archive of recent issues in PDF format. 

To reduce the risk of spreading the COVID-19 virus, the March luncheon is postponed. Check back on this website periodically for updates on future luncheons and other programs.

ISIS: A Retrospect and Prospects for the Future

In his talk to the World Affairs Council, Dr. Craig Whiteside will discuss the rise and staying power of ISIS, as well as why it will continue to impact regional stability for some time to come.

Click the dateline above to read more.


WACMB coordinates two ongoing discussion groups that address a new current topic each month. The sessions are are free and open to the public.

The annual Great Decisions series continues this month, with its final meeting on March 23. Great Decisions, produced by the Foreign Policy Association of America, is the country’s largest discussion program. WACMB presents this free program at two locations: Monterey Peninsula College (MPC) and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at the Ryan Ranch location of California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB).

If you’ve enjoyed Great Decisions, you can keep the conversation going after March 23. WACMB offers two ongoing Discussion Groups that meet at the same MPC and OLLI locations. The groups typically meet on either the 2nd or 3rd Monday of each month. Look for more information about our Discussion Groups in the April Passport.

Click the headline above to read more.


Click the headline above to read more.


Program Report: Jeffrey Knopf

For our January luncheon, the World Affairs Council was honored to welcome Dr. Jeffrey Knopf of MIIS, who spoke on “How to Stop a Dictator from Using Chemical Weapons: Lessons from the US Response to Syria.” Knopf noted the prevalence of chemical weapon attacks in the Syrian civil war: there have been more than 300 to date, with 98 percent launched by the Syrian regime, which is led by Bashar al-Asad and is based in Damascus. The policy dilemma for leaders in Washington and elsewhere was between the moral repulsion caused by the use of chemical weapons by a nasty regime, and the aversion to actively intervening in someone else’s civil war. Under such circumstances, what coercive steps can be taken to persuasively discourage a dictator from using chemical weapons without getting too involved in the war?

Unfortunately, the answer is “not much” — at least when the regime feels that its very survival is at stake. This was Knopf’s primary conclusion: that credible threats are more meaningful against a dictator who does not believe that his own survival is in the balance. When that dictator fears for own his survival and that of his regime, then there is very little that outside powers can do to prevent him from taking any manner of draconian and nasty steps. In the case of Syria, Asad knew that the use of chemical weapons might draw a response from the Trump administration, which did happen twice; however, it was still more important to Asad to survive, and chemical weapons were essential to the strategy of survival undertaken by his regime. Therefore, Asad was willing to risk potential US strikes and continued to use chemical weapons. The outcome is that the regime in Damascus has won the Syrian civil war, due, in part, to its use of chemical weapons.


This is the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). Founded in 1951, the council is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization established to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs. WACMB is a tax-exempt 501 (c) (3) organization, EIN-770301206. Contributions are tax deductible as permitted by law. WACMB sponsors monthly luncheons, discussion groups, and student scholarships.

Corporate and institutional support for the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is provided by:

  • California State University Monterey Bay
  • Defense Language Institute
  • Monterey Peninsula College
  • Naval Postgraduate School
  • Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey
  • Rancho Canada
  • Horan & Lloyd Law Firm


WACMB Logo


Passport for February 2020

This is an online version of the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). You may click here to see other online issues or click here to reach the archive of recent issues in PDF format. 

The Climate Crisis: A Major Challenge for the World

In his presentation to the World Affairs Council, Mike Clancy will provide an overview of climate change and its consequences; he will explore the relevant science, review international agreements, and discuss technologies and strategies for mitigation.

Click the dateline above to read more.


WACMB coordinates two ongoing discussion groups that address a new current topic each month. The sessions are are free and open to the public.

On January 27, both of the WACMB Discussion Groups will begin the annual Great Decisions series, which is produced by the Foreign Policy Association of America and is the country’s largest discussion program. The program, which runs for eight weeks, provides background information and policy options for some of the most critical issues facing us each year. WACMB presents this free program at both of our regular discussion group locations: Monterey Peninsula College (MPC) and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at the Ryan Ranch location of California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB).

Click the headline above to read more.


Click the headline above to read more.


The World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area Welcomes Our New Members

We are delighted to welcome the new members of the World Affairs Council:

  • Julie Campbell
  • Michael Carbaugh and Suzette Cavanaugh Singer
  • Lorraine Comanor
  • Jack and Marilyn Erickson
  • James Gabbe
  • Susan Hocevar
  • Robert and Rae Janzen
  • Robert Nelson


WACMB in Profile: Gabby Walters

Gabby Walters describes herself as a “news junkie,” and no wonder, given her life’s trajectory. Born in Chicago, she graduated from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana with degrees in English and Speech. After stints teaching high school English in Phoenix and working for The Asia Foundation in San Francisco, she was recruited by the US Information Agency (USIA), and set off to see – and write about – the world.

Gabby was first sent to Washington, DC, for an intensive course in French to prepare for her first assignment at the US embassy in Paris. After two years, she took her French to Geneva, where she worked at the US Mission to the European Headquarters of the United Nations during the Arms Control and Disarmament talks as well as the Kennedy Round of trade negotiations. Gabby was stationed in Geneva for nearly three years, and was then posted back to DC, where she remained for the rest of her career. She first did editorial work in USIA’s book program; then she moved over to the magazine division, where she worked for more than a decade on the Agency’s magazine for sub-Saharan Africa. This gave her the opportunity to travel to Africa to cover stories there and assess the effectiveness of USIA’s magazine program in the region. One memorable trip took her to South Africa during apartheid. Partway through her tenure in DC, she was awarded a fellowship for a year’s study at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service.

After retiring from USIA in 1992, Gabby focused on the joys of retirement, doing as little as possible except for playing tennis, reading, entertaining, and traveling to visit friends all around the world, including a trip to Burma long before it opened to the West. One particular trip changed Gabby’s life: a 1997 visit to her old friend and colleague Mary Boyken in lovely Carmel-by-the-Sea, just three blocks from the ocean. Trading DC’s cold snowy winters and hot humid summers for the mild climate of the Monterey Peninsula, Gabby moved west to join Mary. They later moved to Quail Lodge in Carmel Valley, and are now at the Park Lane in Monterey.

Gabby’s many years of government service gave her a deep interest in both domestic and international politics and issues, so the World Affairs Council was a natural fit for her. She spent twelve years on the board, including six years as secretary. Although she’s now retired from the board, she continues to feed her addiction to international events through various WAC programs. When she’s not attending luncheon talks or traveling around the country to visit family and friends, Gabby can be found reading – she says that she subscribes to more magazines and newspapers than she could ever read – or surfing the internet, and loving every minute of it!


This is the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). Founded in 1951, the council is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization established to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs. WACMB is a tax-exempt 501 (c) (3) organization, EIN-770301206. Contributions are tax deductible as permitted by law. WACMB sponsors monthly luncheons, discussion groups, and student scholarships.

Corporate and institutional support for the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is provided by:

  • California State University Monterey Bay
  • Defense Language Institute
  • Monterey Peninsula College
  • Naval Postgraduate School
  • Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey
  • Rancho Canada
  • Horan & Lloyd Law Firm


WACMB Logo