Passport for November-December 2020

This is an online version of the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). You may click here to see other online issues or click here to reach the archive of recent issues in PDF format. 

Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19

Check your email on the scheduled days for links to these videos

November 15, 2020

Michael Auslin
Stanford University
Asia’s New Geopolitics

The Indo-Pacific is fast becoming the world’s dominant region. Now, as it grows in power and wealth, long-simmering geopolitical competition has re-emerged there. Drawing on his most recent book, entitled Asia’s New Geopolitics: Essays on Reshaping the Indo-Pacific (Hoover Institution Press, 2020), Michael Auslin discusses two key issues transforming the region: China’s ambitious foreign and economic policies and North Korea’s quest for nuclear weapons.

Auslin is the inaugural Payson J. Treat Distinguished Research Fellow in Contemporary Asia at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, a senior fellow at Policy Exchange in London, and a senior advisor for Asia at the Halifax International Security Forum. He is the author of six books, including the best-selling The End of the Asian Century: War, Stagnation, and the Risks to the World’s Most Dynamic Region. Previously, he was an associate professor of history at Yale University, a visiting professor at the University of Tokyo, and a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. He is a longtime contributor to The Wall Street Journal and Foreign Policy, among others.


November 30, 2020

Jonathan Lipman
Mount Holyoke College
The Muslims and Islam in Modern China: Focus on the Uyghurs

About 11 million Uyghurs live in the People’s Republic of China, largely in Xinjiang. In recent years the Chinese government has detained over a million of them, claiming that they hold extremist religious views that are a threat to national security. Many in the international community have accused China of egregious human rights abuses against the Uyghurs. In this presentation, Professor Jonathan Lipman looks at the history and current conditions in Xinjiang, the evidence for widespread abuses, and China’s justifications for its policies and methods.

Trained at Stanford as an historian of early modern and modern China, Jonathan Lipman served on the faculty of Mount Holyoke College from 1977 to 2015. In addition, he has taught as a visiting professor at Doshisha University, Quest University (Canada), Oregon State University, Yale, Harvard, and the University of Washington. Professor Lipman’s research deals primarily with the long-term residence and acculturation of Muslims in China. His 1997 book, Familiar Strangers: A History of Muslims in Northwest China, remains a standard history of the subject.


December 15, 2020

Businessman and Author
J. Morris Hicks
Connecting the Dots to a Sustainable Future

The year 2020, with its outbreak of Covid-19, catastrophic forest fires, floods, and recordsetting temperatures, tells us that nature is declining globally and at unprecedented rates. Drawing on his recent book OUTCRY: Urgent Alarms from Our Planet and What We Can Do About Them, J. Morris Hicks discusses both the impact of economic development on the natural environment and what we can do to slow, stop, or reverse the damage we have done to our biosphere. OUTCRY was co-authored with Stuart H. Scott and published on the 50th anniversary of Earth Day.

An engineer, business executive, and author, J. Morris Hicks earned a BS in industrial engineering from Auburn University and an MBA from the University of Hawaii, a degree he earned while serving as an officer in the US Coast Guard and stationed in Honolulu. Over the past decade, he has devoted himself to promoting the global conversation on sustainability and to seeking solutions to the environmental challenges we face.


Discussion Groups

WACMB offers two discussion groups. Both are free, and meet via Zoom from 4:00 to 5:30 pm. If you are interested in participating in a discussion group, please email the WACMB office at wacmb@redshift.com and let us know.

The MPC Discussion Group is moderated by Judith Glickman.
  • Monday, November 2: Ethics of Warfare and Changing Technology
  • Monday, November 16: The Erosion of Democracy in Hungary and Poland
  • Monday, November 30: Asia’s New Geopolitics: Essays on Reshaping the Indo-Pacific
  • Monday, December 14: Muslims in China Today, with a Focus on the Uyghurs
The OLLI/CSUMB Discussion Group is moderated by John Hetz
  • Monday, November 9: Topic TBA.
  • Monday, December 14: Topic also TBA.

For more information about WACMB Discussion Groups, click here.


United Nations Association Film Festival

The World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is pleased to share this announcement from the United Nations Association, which shares WACMB’s interest in international affairs:

The Monterey Bay Chapter of the United Nations Association of the USA announces its 21st annual International Documentary Film Festival. This year, the festival will offer five excellent films from Kenya, Syria, Cambodia, Gaza, and the United States.

The festival will take place from November 14 through November 18. Due to the pandemic, the festival will be completely online this year, and will be accessible from anywhere in the country. A festival pass costs $5, with the fee covering the “per click” cost of presenting the films. Pass holders may access the films at any time during the festival. For further information, go to the UNA*USA website.


A Little Background Information

On November 30, in our video series Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19, Dr. Jonathan Lipman, Emeritus Professor at Mount Holyoke College, will speak on “The Muslims and Islam in Modern China: Focus on the Uyghurs.” We’ve been hearing a lot about the Uyghurs lately. But who are the Uyghurs? Here’s some information from Dr. Lipman.

By the 15th century, the vast central region across the Ming state’s western frontier, north of Tibet and southwest of Mongolia, had become largely Muslim. It was incorporated into the great Zunghar empire, the last nomadic state in a long history stretching back to the ancient Xiongnu, and was conquered by the Manchu-led Qing dynasty in the mid-18th century. The Qing named this region Xinjiang, the New Frontier.

Its inhabitants did not use a singular ethnonym, but called themselves Musulman (Muslim), Turk (which referred to culture and language, not to national identity), or yarliq (local, meaning “from here).” In the 1920s, under the influence of the Soviet “nationalities policy” (among others), these people gradually came to call themselves, and to be called by others, by the ancient (non-Muslim) name, “Uyghurs.”


An Invitation to All High School Students and Teachers

Our sister World Affairs Council in Dallas/Fort Worth invites high school students and teachers from every WAC across the country to participate in its Global Young Leaders (GYL) Program. This free program, offered online via Zoom, includes student leadership workshops, service projects, career days, competitions, Council speakers, 20 Under 20 programming, internships, teacher workshops, teacher awards, and more. The GYL Program will continue in the spring with many other exciting opportunities.

To register, or for further information, go to this page on the Dallas/Fort Worth chapter’s website. If you are involved with high school education, don’t miss this wonderful, free, socially distanced program!.


Take a Break with a Quick Take!

Did you know that most videos in our Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19 series are only about 15 to 20 minutes long? Presented by experts in their fields, these videos are free, and always available in our video library on our website. Get a Quick Take on a quick break today!


Answers to the October Cryptograms

1AI LEZI KSX XS YRHIVWXERH XLEX ALEX AI HS MR XLI ASVPH MW RSX SRPC KSSH JSV XLI ASVPH; MX’W KSSH JSV YW. MX’W RSX E JSVQ SJ TLMPERXLVSTC; MX’W E JSVQ SJ REXMSREP WIGYVMXC.
— VMGLEVH LEEWW
Solution: We have got to understand that what we do in the world is not only good for the world; it’s good for us. It’s not a form of philanthropy; it’s a form of national security. —Richard Haass

2GSVIV ZIV ML ULIVRTM OZMWH; RG RH GSV GIZEVOVI LMOB DSL RH ULIVRTM.
— ILYVIG OLFRH HGVEVMHLM
Solution: There are no foreign lands. It is the traveler only who is foreign. — Robert Louis Stevenson

3UTNG V TNFO QIDNHILE QVRT, “BVPN VQ TFOL,” V’D FBUFEQ
SNDKSNL SI FQZ, “JIDKFONL SI UTFS?”
— QELGNE X. TFOOVQ
Solution: When I hear somebody sigh, “Life is hard,” I’m always tempted to ask, “Compared to what?” — Sydney J. Harris


This is the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). Founded in 1951, the council is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization established to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs. WACMB is a tax-exempt 501 (c) (3) organization, EIN-770301206. Contributions are tax deductible as permitted by law. WACMB sponsors monthly luncheons, discussion groups, and student scholarships.

Corporate and institutional support for the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is provided by:

  • California State University Monterey Bay
  • Defense Language Institute
  • Monterey Peninsula College
  • Naval Postgraduate School
  • Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey
  • Rancho Canada
  • Horan & Lloyd Law Firm

WACMB Logo

Passport for October 2020

This is an online version of the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). You may click here to see other online issues or click here to reach the archive of recent issues in PDF format. 

Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19

Check your email on the scheduled days for links to these videos

October15, 2020
Bradley J. Strawser
Naval Postgraduate School

Reflections on the Ethics of Warfare and Changing Technology

Dr. Bradley Strawser discusses the ethics of modern warfare and how technology has impacted the degree of civilian casualties. He explores how radical changes in military technology once drove a massive increase in civilian harm in warfare, but argues that today, advances in military technology are reversing that trend, giving us reason for optimism in the future.

Bradley Strawser teaches philosophy in the Defense Analysis department at the Naval Postgraduate School. He is also a Research Associate at Oxford University’s Institute for Ethics, War, and Armed Conflict, which is located in Oxford, UK. Dr. Strawser received his PhD in Philosophy from the University of Connecticut. He has written extensively and lectured throughout the United States and Europe on the ethics of war and peace, military ethics, bioethics, and development ethics.

October 30, 2020
Anna Grzymala-Busse
Stanford University

The Erosion of Democracy in Hungary and Poland

After the collapse of communism in 1989, Hungary and Poland were among the leaders in enacting reforms; they were the first to embrace democracy and to pursue free markets. Yet in the last decade, voters in both Hungary and Poland have elected governments that have attacked liberal democracy by stacking the courts, stifling the free media, barring immigration, and pursuing other self-serving policies. What happened? Professor Anna Grzymala-Busse examines the roots and consequences of the erosion of democracy and why both of these nations have taken this path.

Anna Grzymala-Busse is the Michelle and Kevin Douglas Professor of International Studies in the Political Science department, a Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and the Director of the Europe Center, all at Stanford University. A native of Poland, she has studied post-communist politics in Central and Eastern Europe. She earned her PhD in Government from Harvard University


Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19

The following is the tentative schedule and list of topics for upcoming episodes of WACMB’s “Quick Takes” video program. On the scheduled day, you will receive an email with a link that will take you to the video.

  • November 15: Michael Auslin, Stanford University, who will speak on his new book, Asia’s New Geopolitics: Essays on Reshaping the Indo-Pacific
  • November 30: Jonathan Lipman, Mt. Holyoke College, who will speak on “Muslims in China Today, with a Focus on the Uyghurs.”
  • December 15: J. Morris Hicks, author and engineer, who will speak on “Connecting the Dots to a Sustainable Future.”

Video Library

Just a reminder: every past episode of our “quick takes” series, “Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19,” is available at no cost in our online video library. In addition, videos of a number of our previous luncheon talks (remember when we’d gather together in one room for lunch and a lecture?) are also available there. Go to the Speakers, Topics, and Videos page of this website for links to the videos, including these:

  • Robert Tomlinson on National Security Affairs in the Age of Covid-19
  • Emily Meierding on Oil and Gas Disputes
  • Alex Saragoza on US-Mexico Relations
  • Anne Marie Baylouny on The Syrian Refugee Crisis
  • Francis Fukuyama on The Global Rise of Populist Nationalism
    . . . and more!


Discussion Groups

WACMB offers two discussion groups: one with MPC and one with the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at CSUMB. Both are free. Due to current restrictions on public gatherings, both groups are being conducted on Zoom. If you are interested in participating in a discussion group, please email the WACMB office at wacmb@redshift.com and let us know of your interest.

The MPC Discussion Group, moderated by Judith Glickman, is meeting via Zoom. Meetings take place from 4:00 to 5:30 pm.

Monday, October 5: “Modi’s Agenda in the Year of the Pandemic,” with introductory remarks by Anshu Chatterjee.

Monday, October 19: “Globalization and Governance,” with introductory remarks by Jonathan Czarnecki.

The OLLI/CSUMB Discussion Group, moderated by John Hetz, will meet via Zoom on Monday, October 12 from 4:00 to 5:30 pm, to discuss “Narendra Modi’s Nationalist Agenda in the Era of the Pandemic.”


For more information about WACMB Discussion Groups, click here.


Welcome to Our New Members

The World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area extends a warm welcome to our newest members!

  • Olivia Morgan
  • Celeste Ventura
  • Joe Viviano

Remember to Vote!

Election Day is Tuesday, November 3. Vote-By-Mail ballots will be sent to all registered voters in California beginning on October 5. Why wait? Fill out your ballot right away and return it either through the mail or in person. You must return your ballot no later than November 3. Go to vote.ca.gov to learn more.


CRYPTOGRAMS!

For your shelter-in-place entertainment, The Passport presents WACMB’s second-ever cryptograms. All are quotations that are (at least somewhat) relevant to world affairs. Each quotation is followed by its author’s name. Each cryptogram has its own code. Answers will appear in next month’s Passport.

  1. AI LEZI KSX XS YRHIVWXERH XLEX ALEX AI HS MR XLI ASVPH MW RSX SRPC KSSH JSV XLI ASVPH; MX’W KSSH JSV YW. MX’W RSX E JSVQ SJ TLMPERXLVSTC; MX’W E JSVQ SJ REXMSREP WIGYVMXC.
    — VMGLEVH LEEWW
  2. GSVIV ZIV ML ULIVRTM OZMWH; RG RH GSV GIZEVOVI LMOB DSL RH ULIVRTM.
    — ILYVIG OLFRH HGVEVMHLM
  3. UTNG V TNFO QIDNHILE QVRT, “BVPN VQ TFOL,” V’D FBUFEQ
    SNDKSNL SI FQZ, “JIDKFONL SI UTFS?”
    — QELGNE X. TFOOVQ


Answer Key for September’s Passport Crossword Puzzle

(with your editor’s apologies for the nasty cross at 59-Across/43-Down, which was ridiculously difficult.)



This is the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). Founded in 1951, the council is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization established to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs. WACMB is a tax-exempt 501 (c) (3) organization, EIN-770301206. Contributions are tax deductible as permitted by law. WACMB sponsors monthly luncheons, discussion groups, and student scholarships.

Corporate and institutional support for the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is provided by:

  • California State University Monterey Bay
  • Defense Language Institute
  • Monterey Peninsula College
  • Naval Postgraduate School
  • Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey
  • Rancho Canada
  • Horan & Lloyd Law Firm


WACMB Logo


Passport for September 2020

This is an online version of the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). You may click here to see other online issues or click here to reach the archive of recent issues in PDF format. 

Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19

Check your email on the scheduled days for links to these videos

September 15, 2020
Anshu Chatterjee
Naval Postgraduate School

Narendra Modi’s Nationalist Agenda in the Era of the Pandemic

The past decade has been one of the most challenging decades in India’s modern history. The pandemic introduced a new variable into a country that is facing a declining economy and rising challenges from China, along with the simultaneous rise of Hindu nationalism. In 2019, the BJP, India’s Hindu nationalist party, won a majority for the first time. Immediately after winning its majority, the BJP made two controversial decisions: one removing the autonomy of the Kashmir region, and the second reducing the rights of noncitizens, producing a backlash in civil society. Professor Anshu Chatterjee sheds light on these issues and the implications of the spread of Covid-19 in this setting. Anshu Chatterjee is a Senior Lecturer in the National Security Affairs Department at the Naval Postgraduate School. She received her PhD in Asian Studies from the University of California, Berkeley.

September 30, 2020
Jonathan Czarnecki
Naval War College

Globalization, Governance, and Change

Globalization, the international system that has become a defining force in world affairs and its governance within nation states, can be credited with lifting over a billion people out of severe poverty. But there is increasing opposition to the international integration of capital, technology, and information across national borders. Dr. Jonathan Czarnecki analyses this critical debate and provides insight into our future. Jonathan Czarnecki is Professor of Joint Military/Maritime Operations in the US Naval War College Program at the Naval Postgraduate School. A retired Army Colonel with 27 years of experience in the field, Dr. Czarnecki earned his PhD in Political Science and Applied Social Statistics from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He is the author of over 60 scholarly articles on national security and international relations.


Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19

The following is the tentative schedule and list of topics for upcoming episodes of WACMB’s “Quick Takes” video program. On the scheduled day, you will receive an email with a link that will take you to the video.

  • October 15: Bradley Strawser, NPS – Ethics and Public Policy
  • October 30: Anna Grzymala-Busse, Stanford University – The Erosion of Democracy in Hungary and Poland
  • November 15: TBD
  • November 30: Jonathan Lipman, Mt. Holyoke College – Muslims in China Today

Remember: all the past episodes of our “Quick Takes: Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19” series, along with many videos of previous luncheon talks, are available on the Speakers, Topics, and Videos page of this website.


Discussion Groups

WACMB coordinates two ongoing discussion groups that address a new current topic each month. The sessions are are free and open to the public.


Free MIIS Lecture Series

The Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS) is a longtime and valued partner of WACMB. We are pleased to share their announcement of a free virtual lecture series this fall. Presentations will be followed by Q&A sessions with the audience.

The lectures will take place on Zoom, and advance registration is required in order to receive a Zoom invitation. To register, go to https://tinyurl.com/MIIS-WorldViews and follow the prompts there. Here’s the schedule:

  • Wednesday, September 9, 1:00 – 2:00 PDT
    Professor Pushpa Iyer, Director of the MIIS Center for Conflict Studies, will speak on Pandemic, Protests, and Politics: Prospects for Peace
  • Wednesday, October 14, 4:30 – 5:30 PDT
    Professor Jason Blazakis, Director of the MIIS Center on Terrorism, Extremism, and Counter-Terrorism, will speak on Delving Into the Extremism of White Supremacy: Who Are They, and What Do They Want?
  • Wednesday, October 28, 12:00 – 1:00 PDT
    Professor Jason Scorse, Director of the MIIS Center for the Blue Economy, will speak on The Ocean Climate Action Plan: Turning Ideas Into Advocacy
  • Wednesday, November 11, 4:30 – 5:30 PST
    Professor William Potter, Director of the MIIS James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, and Aubrey Means, MIIS MA Candidate in Non-proliferation Studies and Terrorism Studies, will speak on The US-Russian Nuclear Predicament: Are We Doomed to Cooperate or Simply Doomed?

Crossword Puzzle

For your Shelter-in-Place entertainment, the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area presents its first-ever crossword puzzle! Answers will appear in the October Passport.

You can print this page from your web browser and fill in by hand or click the button below to get a version you can fill in online and print or save.

WAC-Crossword-Puzzle-1b-v03-cropped



This is the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). Founded in 1951, the council is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization established to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs. WACMB is a tax-exempt 501 (c) (3) organization, EIN-770301206. Contributions are tax deductible as permitted by law. WACMB sponsors monthly luncheons, discussion groups, and student scholarships.

Corporate and institutional support for the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is provided by:

  • California State University Monterey Bay
  • Defense Language Institute
  • Monterey Peninsula College
  • Naval Postgraduate School
  • Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey
  • Rancho Canada
  • Horan & Lloyd Law Firm

WACMB Logo

Passport for August 2020

This is an online version of the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). You may click here to see other online issues or click here to reach the archive of recent issues in PDF format. 

Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19

Check your email on the scheduled days for links to these videos

August 15, 2020
Emily Meierding
Naval Postgraduate School

The Pandemic and the Price War: Oil During Covid-19

As the Covid-19 pandemic intensified, oil markets experienced a rocky ride. Dr. Emily Meierding explores the reasons for the collapse of oil prices in the spring of 2020 and discusses the prospects for recovery. Emily Meierding is an Assistant Professor in the Department of National Security Affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey. Her research examines energy geopolitics and environmental security issues. Dr. Meierding’s book, The Oil Wars Myth: Petroleum and the Causes of International Conflict, has just been published by Cornell University Press. She holds a BA in history from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and an MA and PhD in political science from the University of Chicago.

August 30, 2020
Robert Tomlinson
Naval War College

National Security Affairs in the Age of Covid-19

Dr. Robert Tomlinson looks at how America’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic will dramatically shape our foreign policy and national security choices. He argues for the development and promulgation of a new national security strategy that takes into account the new geopolitical reality of America’s role in a post-Covid world. Robert Tomlinson is an Associate Professor of National Security Affairs in the Naval War College’s program at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey. Dr. Tomlinson has a BA from the College of the Holy Cross, master’s degrees from Golden Gate University and California State University, Northridge, and a PhD from Claremont Graduate University. He served in the US Air Force for 26 years, retiring at the rank of Colonel.


Click here for a list of all “Quick Takes” episodes, both published and planned. On the scheduled day, you will receive an email with a link that will take you to the video.


Video Library

Remember: every past episode of our “Quick Takes: Issues Around the World in the Age of Covid-19” series is available in our video library, along with many videos of previous luncheon talks. Go to our Speakers, Topic, and Videos page to view the following Quick Takes:

  • Philipp Bleek on How Prepared Were Governments to Meet Covid-19-Related Issues? (coming on July 30)
  • Mike Clancy on Covid-19 and Climate Change
  • Craig Whiteside on ISIS
  • Glenn E. Robinson’s on Global Jihad

WACMB coordinates two ongoing discussion groups that address a new current topic each month. The sessions are are free and open to the public.

Click the headline above to read more.


High School Essay Contest Winners

This spring, WACMB launched a new initiative: a high school essay contest. Thanks to the Scholarship Committee – Michelle Amirkhanian, Brett Borden, Jean Hurd, Chris Keehn, and Larry Johnson (ex officio) – for their hard work in creating the contest, which aims to encourage interest in international affairs and global studies among local high school students.

Entrants were required to write an essay that addressed the following: If you could change something in current world affairs, what would it be? Why should it be changed, and how would you change it?

You can read or listen to the winning essays by clicking here.

Congratulations to the winners!

  • Jasmine Agha is a junior at York School. Jasmine’s essay, “Fear and Hopelessness in the Unknown,” addresses the catastrophic civil war in Syria and the plight of Syrian refugees.
  • Jane Hoffman is a junior at Santa Catalina School. Jane’s essay, “Confronting the Climate Crisis,” encourages extensive international collaboration to reduce carbon emissions.
  • CJ Hunt is a sophomore at Seaside High. CJ’s essay, “The Problem of Capitalism,” argues for an international shift to economies that are driven by the common good rather than by profits.
  • Angelia Shi is a junior at Santa Catalina School. Angelia’s essay, “Our Future: A Religious Melting Pot,” recommends the study of comparative religions as a way to increase tolerance and decrease conflicts.

How the World is Approaching Covid-19

At the July WACMB Board meeting (conducted via Zoom to allow for safe social distancing), there was a discussion about the ways that different countries are addressing Covid-19. Here in the US, of course, we’re using masks, handwashing, social distancing, and sanitizing wipes, etc. But what practices are encouraged and discouraged elsewhere?

Doug Rogers, our Publicity chair, reached out to friends all around the world to ask about what’s being done in their countries, and they quickly responded.

The poster to the left is from Australia, and emphasizes hand washing for at least 20 seconds. (Sound familiar?)

The other responses came as links to videos, which are mostly PSAs. We think you’ll enjoy them!

Remember: Wash your hands. Wear your mask. Maintain social distancing. We’re all in this together.


CRYPTOGRAMS!

Answers to the Cryptograms in July’s Passport

  1. GN GKV’N UVYQAD NY NIPM ILYQN BUIOU. YVU SQKN LUPGUTU GV GN. IVR GN GKV’N UVYQAD NY LUPGUTU GV GN. YVU SQKN ZYHM IN GN.
    -UPUIVYH HYYKUTUPN
    ANSWER: It isn’t enough to talk about peace. One must believe in it. And it isn’t enough to believe in it. One must work at it.
    -Eleanor Roosevelt
  2. YVH BXWWHG RW MVRPV SWH HWLQGHC MVXY BQCY TH HWLQGHL RC BSGH RBOSGYXWY YVXW YVH YVRWZ YVXY BQCY TH HWLQGHL.
    -LHXW XPVHCSW
    ANSWER: The manner in which one endures what must be endured is more important than the thing that must be endured.
    -Dean Acheson
  3. VG JDX OSIBQ SC Z KXIN CZTSPQ BXZB HXIQSG, “Z GZJVSG JDZJ BSXQ GSJ UGSO VJQ DVQJSIN VQ BSSTXB JS BS HSSIFN SG JDX QYDSFZQJVY ZHJVJPBX JXQJ.”
    -BZKX AZIIN
    ANSWER: In the words of a very famous dead person, “A nation that does not know its history is doomed to do poorly on the Scholastic Aptitude Test.”
    -Dave Barry

This is the monthly newsletter of the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area (WACMB). Founded in 1951, the council is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization established to promote the presentation, discussion, and study of international affairs. WACMB is a tax-exempt 501 (c) (3) organization, EIN-770301206. Contributions are tax deductible as permitted by law. WACMB sponsors monthly luncheons, discussion groups, and student scholarships.

Corporate and institutional support for the World Affairs Council of the Monterey Bay Area is provided by:

  • California State University Monterey Bay
  • Defense Language Institute
  • Monterey Peninsula College
  • Naval Postgraduate School
  • Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey
  • Rancho Canada
  • Horan & Lloyd Law Firm

WACMB Logo